Tag Archives: LinkedIn Publishing Platform

LinkedIn: Sharing Your Company Page On Social Media

Karen Hollenbach, a member of our LinkedIn Experts community on GooglePlus, shared this recent discovery with our group very early this morning. You can now share your Company page on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and GooglePlus. Ready to see how this works?

When you go to your LinkedIn Company page, you will see a blue Edit button to the right. Next to this is a curvy arrow. When you hover over the arrow, you should see these options:
LinkedIn Company Page: sharing to social media channels

If you select LinkedIn, you have the option to share to your personal feed as an update. You can also share to groups, and make the update either public or private:
LinkedIn Company Page: Sharing to LinkedIn profile updates

If you choose Twitter, you can share to the Twitter profile you are currently signed in to (very important to remember this!):
LinkedIn Company Page: sharing page to Twitter page

If you choose Facebook, you can share to your personal Profile Timeline as an update, to a friend’s page, your Company page Timeline, etc.:
LinkedIn Company Page: Sharing to Facebook as update

Finally, if you choose GooglePlus, you can share your Page to your personal Profile as an update, to your Circles, communities or to groups you are a member of:
LinkedIn Company Page: Sharing to GooglePlus profile

So far these are the social media platforms LinkedIn is encouraging us to use to share our Company page. My recommendation is to share your LinkedIn Company page to your networks at least 10% of the 80/20 rule to start with. Measure these posts for click-throughs, sharing and visibility. Post your success stories here! If you see different social media platforms to share from than I’ve posted here, please share with us!

Be strategic. Be visible. Be found.

My Suggestions to LinkedIn Publishing Platform’s Nasty Notifications

A summary of this series.

Since reading Andy Foote’s breaking news July 2nd about a LinkedIn connection’s new ability to unsubscribe from a post in the Notifications panel (thanks much, Andy!), I decided to do what I do best: research, read the concerns, and brainstorm for a solution or two. This post is a summary of my thoughts and what I think might help resolve the problem. Each point is a link back to my blog article so you can read them when your time allows (inbound marketing strategy!).

  1. Subscribe option rather than opting-in everyone and creating an unsubscribe link.
  2. Posting frequency: This is not Facebook!
  3. Solutionist vs. complaining.

Now it’s your turn! What other solutions can you think of? LinkedIn, what are your thoughts? If you have any thoughts or suggestions, please post here or on my linked articles (listed above). NOTE: I fully understand this is a major problem for many people, so please keep comments to a professional manner. Let’s get the conversation going!

Be strategic. Be visible. Be found.


My Suggestions to LinkedIn Publishing Platform’s Nasty Notifications

Third post in a series of three.

Since reading Andy Foote’s breaking news July 2nd about a LinkedIn connection’s new ability to unsubscribe from a post in the Notifications panel (thanks much, Andy!), I decided to do what I do best: research, read the concerns, and brainstorm for a solution or two. I wanted to read what the challenges were and what possible solutions were being offered.

Blah-blah-blah complaintsThe third and final post in this series addresses the complaints themselves. I’m all about educating and informing my base as to what I know and what I am continuing to learn. Complaints are great for bringing a problem to the surface for addressing, but from what I read over the past couple of days (and these posts went back at least a month or more), people complained but didn’t offer any solutions. Complaining is the easy road; the tougher road is brainstorming and thinking of a way to solve it. Here’s my thought:

SOLUTION: Educate people as to how often they should post on the new publishing platform, and what type of content most viewers would like to read. For example, one poster suggested people should post only once a week. Not a bad idea, as it may help bloggers/writers strategically craft posts they want their viewers to see, as well as when the posts should be published. I don’t think LinkedIn should necessarily adopt a publishing policy, but I do think LinkedIn should take the lead and create a Best Practices white sheet.

If you have any thoughts or suggestions, please post here or on my summary post. NOTE: I fully understand this is a major problem for many people, so please keep comments to a professional manner.

Be strategic. Be visible. Be found.


My Suggestions to LinkedIn Publishing Platform’s Nasty Notifications

Second post in a series of three.

Since reading Andy Foote’s breaking news July 2nd about a LinkedIn connection’s new ability to unsubscribe from a post in the Notifications panel (thanks much, Andy!), I decided to do what I do best: research, read the concerns, and brainstorm for a solution or two. I wanted to read what the challenges were and what possible solutions were being offered.

VM blog articlesOne of the challenges/concerns I read over and over was the frequency of the article posts. This new publishing platform (a.k.a. LIPP) is a great way to present your thought leadership on topics in your area(s) of expertise. The problem now is the potential backlog of notifications due to the increasing volume of article posts. Please be realistic with frequency, folks. The LIPP is NOT Facebook and should not be treated in the same manner.

Having said that, I have two possible solutions:

SOLUTION 1: Limit postings on the LIPP to once, maybe twice a week. LinkedIn could also build in a limitation within the platform so writers could not post more than “x” times per week. This will help create a focus on a strategy for writings, hopefully using an editorial calendar to plan monthly/weekly posts.

SOLUTION 2: Write one summary post with links back to your blog articles written around this summary. This inbound strategy will allow viewers to see other writings and get an overview of your thoughts, then choose to click through to the related article links.

If you have any thoughts or suggestions, please post here or on my summary post. NOTE: I fully understand this is a major problem for many people, so please keep comments to a professional manner.

Be strategic. Be visible. Be found.


My Suggestions to LinkedIn Publishing Platform’s Nasty Notifications

First post in a series of three.

Since reading Andy Foote’s breaking news July 2nd about a LinkedIn connection’s new ability to unsubscribe from a post in the Notifications panel (thanks much, Andy!), I decided to do what I do best: research, read the concerns, and brainstorm for a solution or two. I wanted to read what the challenges were and what possible solutions were being offered.

LinkedIn option: hide notificationsLinkedIn Hide Notifications option-Step 2The one mistake LinkedIn may have made with this new publishing platform (a.k.a. LIPP) was to automatically subscribe all 1st connections to each other’s posts. Not a bad idea; that means I won’t miss reading your posts, which were important enough to you to write about. I do see the point of others in that it fills up their notifications’ box, thus becoming a daily annoyance to avoid. Many people have more than 1,000 connections, so if even 1% is writing on the LIPP daily, that’s 10 people out of 1,000. Given the amount of complaints I’ve read in the past couple of days, the number for some is obviously higher.

Additionally, LinkedIn aggregates the posts into categories and broadcasts through LinkedIn Pulse. This allows each post to have a broader reach, as well as allowing viewers to choose to read the posts.

As one of the 25,000 beta-testers chosen to play with platform, I take some responsibility for not bringing this potential issue to LinkedIn’s attention. I found the notifications to be a positive aspect, and didn’t take into account that there would be some writers posting daily.

SOLUTION: give 1st connections the option to SUBSCRIBE rather than unsubscribe. LinkedIn could build in a timeframe with it. For example, I will see 3 posts from “x” first connection before I choose whether or not to subscribe. Then, if I haven’t subscribed to this person’s posts, I won’t see any more until I find a post from him/her and choose to SUBSCRIBE.

If you have any thoughts or suggestions, please post here or on my summary post. NOTE: I fully understand this is a major problem for many people, so please keep comments to a professional manner.

Be strategic. Be visible. Be found.